My Favourite Training Tools: #4 – the FMS

Today’s entry features the Functional Movement Screen (FMS). This makes my list even though it does nothing to get you strong. That’s because it is an assessment tool. I love this tool because it helps me to see where people have problems with the fundamental way that they move, and then that helps me to create a great training program for them that will not only get them “faster, higher, stronger”, but will also help fix movement dysfunction that they have developed in life.

Accepting Aging as an Athlete

In other words, I should have thought it was just a great morning. But instead, I was unhappy with my performance. I should have adjusted better to the wind to throw those two flicks properly. If I had been playing better defense, I would have prevented those two points. After the game my friend Scott commented about what a great and fun game it was. I commented that it was nice but I wasn’t happy with my game. He said something like “Wow, you’re really hard on yourself”. I looked around. Everyone else was all smiles. They understand. I didn’t.

Golf Movement and Swing Assessment – Case Study: Will

I have a feeling there may be a lot of golfers out there. And I suspect just a few of them (read: most) are interested in improving theirs swing. And another small subset (read: large) are addicted to everything to do with golf. And that these people may just be interested to get a complete assessment of their swing, of the way they move without a golf club in their hand, and of the correlation between the limitations in the way they move and the problems they are having with their swing. And hopefully they will also be keen to do the few corrective exercises that will help them to improve their movement and their swing. I would think that those who don’t play as much as they want to because their back gets sore from a round of golf would be particularly keen on this.

Am I Fit Enough to Play?

I believe there is a significant link between asymmetries and previous injury as risk factors. When people return to play from an injury it is usually after being told by their doctor or physical therapist that they are “as strong as they were before they got injured”. But unless the injury was a contact injury, that initial injury occurred because there was a weakness or asymmetry somewhere, so getting back to pre-injury level is not enough.

Want to get in shape for ski season?

You book a great week-long ski vacation somewhere out west. You can’t stop thinking about knee deep powder, and 3,000+ vertical feet, and runs that take half an hour to ski down. Then you start thinking about that, and you remember how bad your legs felt during your last ski vacation. The good thing is that there is a solution. Now the real question: what do you do to prepare for a ski trip – or for ski season for those that hit the slopes locally?