Am I Fit Enough to Play?

I believe there is a significant link between asymmetries and previous injury as risk factors. When people return to play from an injury it is usually after being told by their doctor or physical therapist that they are “as strong as they were before they got injured”. But unless the injury was a contact injury, that initial injury occurred because there was a weakness or asymmetry somewhere, so getting back to pre-injury level is not enough.

The purity of sport: Shinny hockey

No positions, no rules, no tactics, no strategy, no faceoff for the puck. The other team skated tentatively toward us with the puck. “Ready?”. I looked at our players. “Yup”. And the game began. It was an absolute rush.

Shoveling as a workout?

For many, shoveling is the big frustration. It’s hard work if you have a big driveway. I’m not sure if this is a surprise to anyone, but emergency rooms fill up after big snow falls. Okay, I’m sure that doesn’t surprise anyone. Many of the visits are from falling injuries – slippery sidewalks, ski or snowboard tumbles, and of course toboggan injuries. But did you know there is also an increase in cardiac incidents? It turns out that shoveling is both frustrating and dangerous.

Introducing your new best friend, Foam Roll

Like a massage, foam rolling is based on the concept of addressing trigger points in your muscles that can interfere with the muscles ability to relax and lengthen. It is a great option for anyone who consistently has tight muscles. If you are a runner or any athlete involved in running sports, I am going to venture a guess that you will want to roll your IT bands (the outside of your thigh) and gluteals. If you are a runner or any athlete involved in running sports, I am going to venture a guess that you will find these trigger points your IT bands (the outside of your thigh) and gluteals. Skiers and hockey players will likely feel it most in their adductors, gluteals and quads. Office workers?